Talking Social Impact and Style with Sarah Beckett, Co-Founder of Birdsong

The Support Your Sisters Tee by Birdsong London.

I recently had the pleasure of interviewing Sarah Beckett, Co-Founder of Birdsong, a London-based ethical fashion brand. Birdsong’s mantra of ‘no sweatshops, no photoshop’ is one I’m definitely on board with. The team works with a range of women’s groups and young designers to create sustainable, socially impactful pieces. I’ll let Sarah share the rest.

Molly: What led you, Sophie and Ruba to set up Birdsong?

Sarah: We all did the Year Here programme in 2014. Year Here is a postgraduate programme for young people who are interested in social change. It gives you a range of experiences in the social sector and you have to build solutions to problems along the way. We all had different experiences, but shared interests. Sophie had already been involved with lots of women’s activism.

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May Reflections

I’m writing this from a chair next to an open window. The sky outside is blue, barely streaked with clouds. The nearby birds are lively and the air is fresh. I spent the long weekend in good company. As May shifts into June, it’s peaceful here.

Elsewhere, though, it’s been a chaotic month. I mentioned in January that it can be hard to reconcile difficult, world-changing events with ordinary life. When the Manchester attack happened, it felt wrong to focus on anything else. But intense observation seemed wrong too. Within minutes and during the hours that followed, tragic losses were turned into content. Circumstances no family would ever wish for were shared over and over again.

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Talking Work and Wellbeing with Rosie Tressler, CEO of Student Minds

The Student Minds team outside their Turl Street office in Oxford.

This week I spoke to the interesting and admirable Rosie Tressler, CEO of Student Minds. We chatted about work, leadership, mental health and self-care. I hope you enjoy the interview.

Molly: For any readers who aren’t familiar with the organisation, what is Student Minds?

Rosie: Student Minds is the UK’s student mental health charity. We work to empower students and members of the university community to look after their own mental health, support others and create change. In the years to come, we are hoping to create a thriving higher education community.

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5 Essential Tips For New Bloggers

Hello, everyone.

As you’ll know if you read this post, I’ve now been running this site for a year. I recently spent some time reflecting on the lessons I’ve learned so far. If you’re just starting out or looking to refresh your direction, I hope you find the following advice helpful.

1. Use your skills

My professional background is in planning, writing and editing content for blogs, social media, websites, press and print marketing. As much as I enjoy doing this for organisations, I wanted to develop an online space for myself too.

If you’re considering starting a blog, what are your key skills? What can you do well? How can you interest people within and beyond your immediate network? Will you focus on one area (like reviews or recipes) or cover many topics?

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Happy Birthday, Dear Blog

A year ago, I launched the site you’re visiting today. Over the past twelve months, I’ve written about wellness, mental health, introversion, feminism, our online lives, living with coeliac disease and more. I love using this platform to be reflective and creative.

I’m really thankful to everyone who reads, appreciates and shares these posts. I wish I could split a (gluten free) birthday cake with you all. Please let me know if you’d like me to write about a particular topic by commenting below. Alternatively, say hello on Twitter or Instagram.

Here are my ten most popular posts so far:

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On Ambition

I recently read this essay by Elisa Albert, in which she discusses the pressures of ambition and her own frustrations with it. Whilst acknowledging the benefits of hard work, Albert criticises the self-serving nature of ‘Lean In’ culture that is more concerned with achievement than with purpose or human connection. In contrast, Albert is impressed by:

‘Eye contact. Self-possession. Loyalty. Boundaries. Good posture. Moderation. Restraint. Laugh lines. Gardening. Activism. Originality. Kindness. Self-awareness. Simple food, prepared with love. Style. Hope. Lust. Grace. Aging. Humility. Nurturance. Learning from mistakes. Moving on. Letting go. Forms of practice, in other words. Constant, ongoing work. No endpoint in sight. Not goal-oriented, not gendered. Idiosyncratic and pretty much impossible to monetize.’

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