Looking back at my job search

Minimal work space - Creative flat lay photo of workspace desk with sketchbook and wooden pencil on copy space white background. Top view, flat lay photography.

Getting any job, let alone what feels like the right job, is stressful. The whole process is an opportunity for self-evaluation and self-doubt. You might end up delighted, disappointed or somewhere in between.

Since the subject came out on top in an Instagram stories poll, I’ve pulled together this post about my most recent experience.

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25 more things I’ve learned by 25

This month I turn 25. I feel good about this quarter-century birthday. As I step firmly into my mid-twenties, I’m reflecting on more lessons learned so far. You can read similar posts from 2016 and 2017 if you like.

1. I’ve changed in many ways over the last ten years. I’m less anxious, more settled. More ambitious in some areas, less so in others.

2. In some ways I haven’t changed at all. I still enjoy reading, writing, musicals, being in bed at 9:30pm and most things involving Reese Witherspoon.

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On precarious work

The Multi-Hyphen Method Hardback by Emma Gannon (2018)

According to LinkedIn, my profile is of ‘All Star’ quality. Before you close this tab and think I’m terrible, I have a reason for sharing this information. While I have strong communications experience, a list of endorsed skills, positive recommendations and a first class degree, what LinkedIn won’t tell you, and what I often feel hesitant to admit, is that my career to date has been made up of lots of temporary work.

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What I learned from recording every penny I spent for five months

Purse and Coffee on Table (Source: Pexels)

I’ve covered many topics on this blog. So far, money hasn’t been one of them. It can be an awkward subject, so tightly connected to privilege, appearances and security. It’s becoming more common to discuss money within my social circles, potentially thanks to Refinery29’s Money Diaries series and similar articles.

Catch ups with friends often tiptoe around the subject until one of us asks a specific question. Although I would never ask someone to share their financial circumstances if it made them uncomfortable, each conversation has left the air a little clearer. Whether it’s annual salary or monthly housing costs, having points of comparison can help to position and prepare ourselves better.

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